Antique Travel Guide and Itinerary

Antique Travel Guide and Itinerary –  Antique got its tagline “Where the mountains meet the sea” because of the relatively short distance between its mountains and its coast, which lies parallel to it. Just like its highland attractions, there’s absolutely a lot to explore in Antique’s long coastal area aside from providing an unobstructed view of the sunset. On the southernmost tip of Antique is Nogas Island, an uninhabited 26-hectare marine and bird sanctuary.

According to oral history, related as the legend of Maragtas, Antique is believed to be the landing site of ten Bornean Datus who escaped persecution from Sri-Vishaya, a Hindu-Malay empire that existed from the 7th to the 14th century in Borneo and Sumatra. There they met the Negrito/Ati (earliest settlers of Panay) chieftain Marikudo. They bought the island from the chieftain for a golden saduk (headpiece or helmet), and a golden necklace, among other gifts, the event is known as the “Barter of Panay”. The Negritos then retreated to the mountains, while the Borneans settled in the lowlands. Today, the landing is commemorated every year in Antique in the Binirayan festival on the month of April with highlights on April 27 to 29.

The Antiqueños are noted for their industry. They are renowned weavers throughout the Visayas. The Bugasong patadyong, a tube cotton fabric of plaid design, is highly valued because of its fineness of weaving. Piña cloth is also produced in looms throughout the province. Wine manufactured from the sap of the coconut is a cottage industry. Muscovado sugar production is also a big industry in Antique, which has become an attraction of sorts because of Antique’s native delicacies derived from muscovado sugar.

Email us to request your customized dream Vacation Travel.  Antique has many beautiful sites that you do not want to miss. Come, Visit, and explore.

1. The 383-year old Anini-y Church in Anini-y:  Built by the early Augustinian Missionaries, served as a pillar of faith among the Antiqueños. Its magnificent baroque architecture, coral and limestone foundations, and 115-year old bell, have witnessed hundred of calamities including the 8.2 magnitude and intensity 9 Lady Caycay Earthquake that struck Panay in 1948.

The church of Anini-y is the third built in Antique. The first was probably built by Friar Hipólito Casimiro, OSA between 1630 and 1638. The church whose foundations still exist measured 33 x 13 meters. A second church of much greater length but narrower at 48 x 12.5 meters was constructed close to the earlier church. Work on the current church began around 1845. Friar Jeronimo Vaquerín was responsible for completing the present complex, the convento in 1879 and the church, except for the arco toral, was almost completed when the Augustinian left in 1898.

2. The rice terraces, Philippines:The province is home to the indigenous Iraynun-Bukidnon, speakers of a dialect of the Kinaray-a language, who have crafted the only rice terrace clusters in the Visayas through indigenous knowledge and sheer vernacular capabilities. The rice terraces of the Iraynun-Bukidnon are divided into four terraced fields, namely, General Fullon rice terraces, Lublub rice terraces, Bakiang rice terraces, and San Agustin rice terraces. There have been campaigns to nominate the Iraynun-Bukidnon Rice Terraces, along with the Central Panay Mountain Range, into the UNESCO World Heritage List.

For the year 1998, production of palay, the primary crop of the province, registered a total of 177,521 metric tons (mt.) or 4,438,025 cavans from 58,847 hectares with an average yield of 3.02 metric tons per hectare. An increase of 8,280 mt. or 16.37 percent over last years (1997) production was observed because the area harvested has increased by 9,822 hectares or 5.86 percent.

Antique Travel Guide and Itinerary

Antique Travel Guide and Itinerary

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